THE SHADOWS – Nostrum Deus Lucifer

Ten years after Die Dollar Die, Phillip Banks returns in The Shadows.

G5

Buy at www.robertsalisbury.com

The Shadows_Cover_Inside Pages.jpg

The Shadows – Nostrum Deus Lucfier

Set in the world of private banking this conspiracy thriller offers a glimpse into the plans and motivations of those who rule the world: The Shadows.

Phillip Banks is a rising star at one of London’s oldest banks, Delonge Martin. Tasked with the acquisition of a Swiss pharmaceutical company, he deals his way from the Arctic North to the deserts of Saudi Arabia, playing his part in the tight-knit world of politics and the uber-rich.

Varangian Protocols

‘Our aim is the creation of a highly talented but helplessly dependant population’

‘Punishment is a kindness, it reassures order and establishes the value of things’

‘Poverty serves a higher purpose, to warn those above to adhere to the system’


In this cautionary tale of the not too distant future Robert Salisbury draws into question The Shadows and their right to anonymity.

 

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Die Dollar Die – The Trailer

Trailer to the book – Die Dollar Die – Fall of the American Colossus

To buy the book go to http://www.diedollardie.com

R J Salisbury on Man’s Fear of Truth

Robert Salisbury - Is Fear Of Truth Stopping Progress

Talk at the Philosopher’s Corner – The Imperial Hotel, Sydney.

War Is Good

In the book Die Dollar Die, Jeffrey Choi states that ‘War is good’.

When war begins, we will need weapons, my factories will run night and day, making me the richest man in China. So you see, War is good.

His reasoning is simplistic and purely selfish, but it does encapsulate a fundamental problem in the policing of commerce, to prevent inherent avarice from encouraging or aiding the onset of war?

He also goes on to make the point, about the West,

‘Your country has lived the good life too long. Now you are in debt, your wages too high, can not afford to employ your people, who no longer make anything. Your rich refuse to pay tax, your politicians weak, your companies bankrupt. The world of work belongs to China.

But in war, your rights & freedoms, your social safety net, your free schools and hospitals that have killed your economy will be wiped away. When you have nothing left, China will rebuild you, employ you, Caucasians are good workers, you will make products for us to buy. 

This alarmist view, is a cultural inversion, designed to point out the iniquities of an imbalanced world, where money and wealth determine lifestyle. From the Westerner point of view, it is not altogether palatable. But it strikes at the heart of where and why such power is wielded: to maintain an uneven playing field upon which one side may exploit the other. It also provides an explanation as to why peaceful and otherwise moral societies can be guilt of endorsing or turning a blind eye to the instigation of war or atrocity.

War is Good. [Jeffrey Choi]